Recent Grants Awarded

Doctors for Global Health

Decatur, GA

Doctors for Global Health was awarded a two-year, $50,000 grant for the project, A Partnership to Strengthen Health Care Delivery and Improve Health in Rural Communities in El Salvador.

The project involves an ongoing partnership between Doctors for Global Health and the local Salvadoran NGO Asociación de Campesinos para el Desarrollo Humano (Peasant Association for Human Development) and will serve approximately 5000 impoverished people in Estancia, Agua Blanca, and Guachipilín in the Department of Morazán in northeastern El Salvador.  This population has some of the worst health indicators in the country, with high rates of food insecurity and childhood malnutrition; maternal mortality; communicable and non-communicable diseases. They have limited access to primary, subspecialty, and emergency health care and oral health care through the Salvadoran health system. El Salvador is one of 57 countries identified by the WHO as having a critical shortage of health care workers (defined as less than 23 doctors, nurses, and midwives per 10,000 population); CHW are the backbone and champions of CDH’s programs and projects. Funding will support the following activities: provide pediatric and adult primary care in the local clinic (CAIPES); coordinate diagnostic and subspecialty referrals; sustain the oral health program; support the Siete Semillas (Seven Seeds) Nutrition Program, provide ongoing professional development for the CAIPES staff; and develop and launch CDH’s first website.

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to improve the health and well-being of the people in Estancia, Agua Blanca, and Guachipilín in the Department of Morazán in northeastern El Salvador.

Family Care International

New York, NY

Family Care International was awarded a two-year, $100,000 grant for the project, Overcoming Barriers to Care: Improving indigenous women’s access to maternity services in the Bolivian Amazon.

 In the Bolivian lowland villages, emergency transportation to the hospital for women facing childbirth complications — inconvenient and barely affordable at the best of times — becomes simply unavailable in the rainy season, when they are cut off by flood waters. Bolivian legislation now supports the establishment of “maternity waiting homes,” adjacent to hospitals in rural areas, where pregnant women at risk can stay when their due date is near so that they can have immediate access to skilled childbirth care at the hospital when necessary. This project will contribute to reducing maternal mortality in the province of Moxos, department of Beni, in Bolivia, by improving access to skilled maternity care for women living in isolated communities, and improving the health network’s capacity to respond to obstetric emergencies. This project will be implemented in Moxos for a period of 24 months. The population served (primary target) is 5,000 indigenous women of childbearing age living in rural and isolated communities in Moxos; the secondary population served are the 25,000 indigenous women and men living in the hospital’s catchment area.

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to c
ontribute to reducing maternal mortality in Moxos, district of Beni, by improving access to skilled maternity care for women living in isolated areas.

 

Health and Development International

Newburyport, MA

Health and Development International  was awarded a two-year, $190,000 grant for the project, Rapid Reduction of Maternal and Perinatal Mortality and Obstetric Fistula in Niger. 

The project aims to rapidly prevent women from dying in childbirth and rapidly prevent obstetric fistula. The project expanded to its current size in May-June 2010 after starting in February 2008. Due to population growth and the 2010 expansion, the project now serves about 327,000 people, most of them subsistence farmers and nomads, the vast majority being illiterate. The current project area, about the size of Rhode Island and Delaware combined, has one road (unpaved) through each of its three distinct portions, essentially no electricity, few sources of safe water, and had no doctor. The IZUMI-supported area’s population of now 69,000 lives in 119 participating communities covered by six health centers. One of the originally five health-center areas has been divided into two as part of government’s continuing effort to improve health care to the population. Having achieved the initial aim of at least 75% fewer women dying of blocked childbirth and at least 50% fewer fistula cases within two years, the aim is to sustain the results by continuing to use a man and a woman volunteer in each village, monthly reporting, and eight other organizational tools. Village volunteers, especially the women, have several responsibilities, most importantly:  i) encourage pregnant women to go to the nearest health center for prenatal consultation,  ii) encourage each pregnant woman to have her baby at a health center, where a trained nurse or a “midwife assistant” can help in emergencies,  iii) ask in advance for permission to evacuate the woman should she experience prolonged labor in the village,  iv) initiate emergency medical evacuation if labor lasts too long, i.e. if the female volunteer sees that the sun may rise a second time over a woman in labor,  v) register data on a form as events occur, a form designed for illiterate people. Data are collected from each village during monthly supervision. Program adjustments are made as needed, based on the data. Feedback is provided to volunteers each month, and to all interested parties through an Annual National Program Review where delegates from villages, ministries, and external partners discuss how to improve the project based on its results. With results from the initial pilot area now publish in a well-regarded medical journal in November 2014, HDI must sustain the program until it becomes more widely known and hopefully supported by major donors.

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to rapidly prevent obstetric fistula, save women’s and babies’ lives, protect women’s dignity using methods from successful disease eradication programs, and to expand the project to the rest of Niger and other countries as rapidly as the results justify.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Global Health and Human Rights

Boston, MA

Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Global Health and Human Rights was awarded a two-year, $115,000 grant for the project, Catalyzing Innovations for Health Transformation in Resource-Limited Settings, located in Kenya.

With support from the IZUMI Foundation, MGH will build and strengthen the African Institute for Health Transformation (AIHT), the premier health innovations laboratory in the country of Kenya. The AIHT will be housed at western Kenya’s Sagam Community Hospital. The goal of AIHT is to strengthen the health system in Kenya – and beyond – via development of an entrepreneurial platform that fosters the design and development of scalable innovations for health transformation in resource-limited settings. The centerpiece of the AIHT is an initiative led by MGH – the African continent’s first Family and Emergency Medicine (F&EM) Postgraduate Training program led by MGH and its Kenyan partners, which will, for the first time ever, train Kenyan medical school graduates (and other East African doctors)  to become future leaders in Family and Emergency Medicine. (The residency program started on September 15, 2014.) The graduates of this novel program will be in leadership roles and subsequently serve rural, underserved populations throughout Kenya and beyond. In addition, the AIHT will be the “hub” for a number of different research endeavors focused on improving maternal and child health outcomes, and emergency care, all of which are being overseen by MGH.

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to strengthen the health system in western Kenya – and beyond – via development of an entrepreneurial platform that fosters the design and development of scalable innovations for health transformation in resource-limited settings. The specific objective is to design and build out the physical infrastructure for the AIHT, which is co-located with the Sagam Community Hospital. MGH has teamed with the world-renowned Rhode Island School of Design’s Departments of Architecture and Industrial Design to apply cutting-edge modern theory to design the AIHT in a culturally-appropriate manner.