Recent Grants Awarded

Dignitas International

Toronto, ON

Dignitas International was awarded a one-year, $100,000 grant for the project, Scaling Up Integrated Care in Malawi.

The project will make valuable progress towards the overall goal to improve the detection and treatment of TB patients who are co-infected with HIV across the supported sites in the Southeast Zone (SEZ) of Malawi by achieving the following results over a 12-month period:

  • Develop a new one-stop TB/HIV clinic at Balaka District Hospital
    • Taking lessons learned during the establishment of a one-stop TB/HIV clinic at Machinga District Hospital, Dignitas will construct a new one-stop TB/HIV clinic at Balaka District Hospital.
  • Scale-up TB infection prevention and control measures across the SEZ
    • Dignitas will provide ongoing training and mentorship for health workers at the two established TB/HIV integrated clinics (Zomba and Machinga) and the new TB/HIV integrated clinic (Balaka), improving the quality of care for patients at all three supported sites. Best practices for TB/HIV co-treatment will be incorporated into Dignitas’ ongoing training and mentorship of 500+ health workers in more than 125 clinics across the SEZ. Dignitas will establish the role of TB Focal Person to coordinate Infection Control Committees at supported sites. The Infection Control Committees will promote best practices in infection control and TB testing among health workers.
  • Develop and pilot national integrated TB/HIV policies, programs and tools
    • Decision-makers at the Malawi MoH, the National TB Programme, and other health organizations have expressed interest in scaling up the TB/HIV model developed by Dignitas. They will work with policymakers and frontline health workers to formulate national policy and training tools for integrated TB/HIV care.

 

Overall goal

The overall goal of this program is to improve the detection and treatment of TB patients who are co-infected with HIV across the supported sites in the SEZ of Malawi.

Direct Relief

Santa Barbara, CA

Direct Relief was awarded a two-year, $100,000 grant for the project, Strengthening Healthcare Infrastructure in Guyana.

The proposed project  will improve the healthcare system of the small South American country of Guyana by providing medicines, medical supplies, and medical equipment at no charge to hospitals, health centers, and rural outreach programs that provide essential healthcare services to the country’s most vulnerable people. Direct Relief will accomplish this over a two-year period by increasing access to appropriate medical goods for Guyana Medical Relief (GMR), a non-profit medical assistance organization established to support the provision of healthcare services in Guyana, and the network of public healthcare facilities located throughout the country that they support. Donations of specifically-requested medical products will be shipped to Guyana where GMR will oversee their distribution and use. Providing needed medical items will increase the capacity of public healthcare facilities to care for their patients and lead to improved population and community health outcomes.

Overall goal

The goal of Direct Relief’s project is to strengthen the public healthcare infrastructure in Guyana.

Foundation for African Medicine and Education (FAME)

Redding, CA

FAME was awarded a three-year, $200,000 grant for the project, Quality Healthcare for Rural Tanzania: Building Capacity, Strengthening Programs, and Expanding Services at FAME Medical.

This project aims to improve the quality of medical care for rural communities living in the Northern Highlands of Tanzania. To this end, the FAME Medical team will engage in the following activities over the next three years: 1) rigorous staff development and capacity building programs to insure quality services for their patients, particularly pregnant women and children 2) quality improvement exercises and expanded services across departments, with special emphasis on maternal and child health 3) implementation of a management system focused on efficiency and cost effectiveness in service design and delivery 4) provision of patient education and support that promotes wellness and continuity of care and 5) infrastructure development that supports the needs of FAME’s growing patient population.

 

Overall goal

The overall goal of the project is to improve the quality of medical care for rural communities living in the District of Karatu in order to improve the health and wellbeing of the Tanzanian people.

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

Boston, MA

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health was awarded a two-year, $150,000 grant for the project, Homestead Agriculture and Nutrition Project in Rufiji District, Tanzania.

Although more than three-quarters of Tanzanians are small-scale farmers, child undernutrition affects millions of Tanzanian children. Additionally, routine nutrition and health services are lacking in rural communities where most Tanzanians live. Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health propose to conduct an integrated, gender-sensitive, agriculture, nutrition and health intervention with the goal of improving the nutrition and health of children and women in rural Tanzania. HSPH’s project would address child undernutrition by tackling its underlying causes. We would utilize specially trained Agricultural Extension Workers (AEWs) and Community Health Workers (CHWs) to guide farming households on best practices for the cultivation of nutrient-rich crop varieties and homestead livestock production, while also providing them with basic nutrition and public health counselling services. Project AEWs and CHWs would employ three main approaches for reaching households: (1) Village Model Farms through which AEWs and female farmers would illustrate innovative agricultural practices to the community; (2) regular household visits with all smallholder farming households in the community; and (3) regular village-level meetings to engage community leaders and heads of households. The project would therefore be innovative in utilizing AEWs (assisted by CHWs) as a sustainable workforce for providing basic public health and nutrition education in rural communities suffering from chronic healthcare worker shortages. HSPH’s primary targets are women and children in rural households. Thus, they expect that participation in the intervention would lead to increased home food production, improved diets and nutrition of vulnerable household members, improved health behaviors, and empowerment of women. Long-term impacts could include lower levels of childhood infections and mortality, and higher levels of optimal child development. The project will occur in 5 villages in Rufiji District, Pwani Region, Tanzania, over 24 months for all activities. The actual intervention will be implemented over 14 months using a staggered approach (stepped-wedge design), so both the implementation and the evaluation of the intervention can be rigorously done. Rufiji District has demographic characteristics representative of rural Tanzania, such that if successful, our intervention can be scaled-up to the rest of Tanzania and to other developing countries.

 Overall goal

The program goal is to improve the nutrition and health of children and women in rural Tanzania through an integrated, gender-sensitive, agriculture, nutrition and health intervention, while also exploring the use of AEWs (assisted by CHWs) as a sustainable workforce for providing basic public health and nutrition education in rural communities.

Sanergy

Nairobi, Kenya

Sanergy was awarded a two-year, $130,000 grant for the project, Fresh Life in Schools.

Sanergy will partner with Izumi Foundation to provide hygienic sanitation in up to 20 schools in the Mukuru and Mathare slums of Nairobi, Kenya over two years, with a focus on schools that have completed Sanergy’s WASH in schools intervention but lack the funds to invest in Fresh Life Toilets (FLTs). Through this partnership, Sanergy will serve approximately 4,000 children – the demographic most vulnerable to sanitation-related disease.  Activities include the identification of schools by our sales team, the construction and installation of Fresh Life Toilets, the implementation of hygiene promotion, and the regular collection and treatment of the waste from the FLTs.

Project Goal and Objectives

The goal of the project is to increase access to improved sanitation and to promote hygiene among children in schools in Nairobi’s informal settlements.

Objectives:

1. Launch Fresh Life Toilets in up to 20 schools over 2 years
2. Deliver hygiene promotion and operational support to 20 schools over 2 years
3. Ensure all waste is removed safely and regularly from Fresh Life Toilets in 20 schools over 2 years